Transferring Fuel From An FI Bike

A Trail-Pack Tool Every Rider Should Know About.

FI-fuel-Transfer-1Transferring fuel out of a Fuel-Injected bike isn’t as easy as pulling the fuel line off the petcock and draining the gas from one bike into a container. With a fuel pump in the way, gas does not just flow right out. This simple setup could eliminate the need to siphon gas out of the top of the tank and let the pump do the work.

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The first thing you need is the male portion of the fuel line connector. This is a KTM part (p/n 77707010000) that retails for about $12.

 

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You can also use a generic fuel line connector like the one pictured here from Tusk. Clicking the picture will take you to where you can buy it for about $10.
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The connectors insert and open up the fuel line which is under pressure but only a little fuel will spill out.

 

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Having a couple of extra clamps attached to the fuel line can come in handy if you have a fuel line issue. Using a short section of high pressure fuel line as your transfer hose is also a good idea as it can be used as a spare if the need arises.
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When time comes to transfer the fuel, simply disconnect the line from your tank to the throttle body and attach your fuel transfer hose by clicking it in. A small amount of gas will come out. Then to transfer fuel you either cycle the key, the ignition switch or just tap the start button to get gas to flow for a second at a time. On kick-start only bikes a short kick is usually enough to get the pump to cycle. Keep cycling the pump till the desires amount of fuel is transferred.

 

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You do not need a really long section of hose as just laying the receiving bike on the ground and rolling the gas supplying bike up alongside will usually require less than 12-inches of hose.

Though we don’t ever want to be “that guy” having a connector and a hose packed away might just make you the solution. Or at least you have one if you run dry on the trail.